What Elections Can I Vote In On May 5?

Elections are being held in every corner of the UK on 5 May – but there are loads of different contests for organisations ranging from regional assemblies to police commissioners and local councils.

It’s all very confusing, so BuzzFeed News has made this app to tell you what your local area is voting on – and what it means.

Simply enter your postcode below, or use the “locate me” button if you’re currently in the same place where you’re registered to vote.

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Here’s what you can vote in (assuming you pressed the locate button in the same place you live):
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And this is what they mean:

Scottish Parliament Election

You have two ballot papers for the Holyrood parliament election: One is for an individual in your local constituency (e.g. Edinburgh Central) and one is for a party on the regional list (e.g. Lothians). The constituency vote is run on a first-past-the-post basis, while the list is run using a form of proportional representation. You are allowed to vote for two different parties on the two different ballots.

Welsh Assembly Election

You have two ballot papers for the Cardiff Bay election: One is for an individual in your local constituency (e.g. Ceredigion) and one is for a party on the regional list (e.g. Mid and West Wales). The constituency vote is run on a first-past-the-post basis, while the list is run using a form of proportional representation. You are allowed to vote for two different parties on the two different ballots.

Northern Ireland Assembly Election

You have one ballot paper for the Northern Ireland assembly election. It’s run on the single transferable vote system, which means you get to rank up to six candidates from the list. Six politicians are elected for each large constituency and you can vote for multiple politicians from the same political party.

Mayoral Elections in London, Bristol, and Liverpool

There’s just one ballot paper for mayoral votes in England, although they’re run on the supplementary vote system. This means you vote for your first choice candidate to be mayor and then for your second choice.

London Assembly Election

You have two ballot papers for the London assembly election, which elects politicians to scrutinise the mayor: One for an individual in your local constituency (e.g. Lambeth and Southwark) and one for a party on the London-wide list. The constituency vote is run on a first-past-the-post basis, while the list is run using a form of proportional representation. You are allowed to vote for two different parties on the two different ballots.

Police and Crime Commissioner Elections

There’s just one ballot paper for police and crime commissioners, who hold the police to account in most of England and Wales. It’s run on the same supplementary vote system as mayoral elections, which means you choose your first choice candidate and then your second choice.

Local Council Elections

There’s just one ballot paper for local council elections in England and Wales. Individuals are elected for small local constituencies called “wards” on a first-past-the-post basis.

Paul Curry is an editorial developer for BuzzFeed and is based in London.

Contact Paul Curry at Paul.Curry@BuzzFeed.com.

Jim Waterson is a politics editor for BuzzFeed News and is based in London.

Contact Jim Waterson at jim.waterson@buzzfeed.com.

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